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Sensitive Skin, Food allergy symptoms, Irritation. Doctor dermatolog and patient, wondering how to tell if you're allergic to skincare products.

How to Tell You’re Allergic to Skincare Products

At the end of a long, stressful day, taking a hot shower and indulging in your skincare routine can be the best way to unwind and pamper yourself. But what if instead of feeling comforted and clean, your skin starts to break out and/or become itchy? Unfortunately, this usually means your skin is having an allergic reaction to a product you just used.

Our experts are explaining how to tell you’re allergic to skincare products below!

Reactions to Look Out For

Here are some of the most common ways your skin might negatively react to ingredients in your skincare products:

  • Red, itchy, and irritated skin, otherwise known as dermatitis.
  • Red pimples.
  • Flaky skin.
  • Sensitivity on the skin.

The important detail to remember is that an allergic reaction caused by skincare products will stay only on your skin. If you start to have other symptoms, like a runny nose or feeling queasy, another issue may be to blame.

What Causes This Reaction?

To figure out why your skin might be having a negative reaction, you have to consider common skincare ingredients. Unfortunately, this can be tricky, because there are thousands of different types of ingredients used across skincare products. For example, maybe you’re allergic to the preservatives or chemical components of certain fragrances in your face wash. Or perhaps the base ingredient in that anti-aging serum doesn’t sit well with your skin.

So, if you wake up with a skin reaction, the best way to determine the cause is to retrace your skincare steps and specifically examine the ingredients in those products.

What to Do if You Think You’re Allergic

If you suspect you’re having an allergic reaction to skincare products, stop using any of the products that could possibly have caused the reaction. Next, schedule an appointment with your dermatologist as soon as possible. If you’re able, it’s also helpful to record the times your symptoms appeared and which products you’ve been using. If you can bring them to your appointment, even better.

Bringing this information to your dermatologist will help them narrow down what could be happening. That way, the two of you can figure out which products are best to avoid and which products you can use instead.

Avail Dermatology is here for any of your skincare needs. If you have any further questions about the history of skincare or want to speak to our staff, click here to reach out or give us a call at 770-929-9033. Click here to learn more about our telemedicine efforts!

What is Keratosis Pilaris?

What is Keratosis Pilaris?

Keratosis pilaris, also known as KP, is an extremely common skin condition that affects almost three million people worldwide. Despite its commonality, not much is known about this chronic, long-term skin condition, and many people who have it may not even realize that their skin is abnormal.

To learn more about keratosis pilaris from the experts at Avail Dermatology, keep reading below.

What is Keratosis Pilaris?

Keratosis is a common skin condition that causes the skin in certain areas to have a bumpy appearance, often described as “chicken skin.” By far, the most common location is on the upper outer arms, but less commonly, it can affect the outer thighs, and lateral cheeks on the face. These bumps are caused by an build-up of keratin, , which is the protein that is forms the outer layer of the skin. In KP, the keratin builds up into tiny “mounds” around individual hair follicles. .It is an extremely common condition, particularly in children and adolescents, with some estimates as high as 50% to 80% of adolescents showing some degree of KP. It often worsens in winter when the skin is dry, particularly in patients who also have eczema, a common finding.

Generally, KP improves with age and is less common in adults, though still not rare. Generally, KP does not cause symptoms, although in rare cases it can lead to skin irritation and peeling.

KP appears to be a genetic disorder, and many patients have a family history of KP. There are some studies suggesting that abnormal genes that control the production and function of keratin may be responsible for the condition.

How is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?

Just as it is not truly known what causes KP, there is also no known cure. The good news is that, most often, keratosis pilaris disappears with age and will go away on its own.

However, there are several ways to help manage your symptoms if they are a burden to you. Follow these steps to do just that:

  • Keep your body moisturized. This remains the hallmark of therapy for KP. Moisturizing reduces the appearance of the bumps and prevents peeling and scaling. Some moisturizers may be more effective for KP. These include alpha hydroxy acid moisturizers, which contain ingredients like lactic or glycolic acid. By accelerating exfoliation, they may reduce the bumpy texture of the skin.
  • Start new daily habits. Along with moisturizers, try out warm water instead of hot water for your bath, and add moisture to your home with a humidifier.
  • Work with your doctor. More resistant or bothersome cases of KP may need additional treatment. Work with your trusted dermatologist to help formalize a plan that will be best for you and your skin. Your physician will be able to recommend the best products and help you to avoid practices that may not lessen your keratosis pilaris.

If you would like assistance with managing your keratosis pilaris, then reach out to the trusted dermatology experts at Avail Dermatology. We’ll be happy to formulate a management plan that is just right for you and your skin.

Give us a call at 770-251-5111 or click here to schedule an appointment.